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Author Topic: DAILY BRIEFING  (Read 81656 times)

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Offline rufusredtail

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Re: DAILY BRIEFING
« Reply #195 on: February 01, 2018, 01:16:00 PM »

DID YOU KNOW ?

BLITZ

Spring-clean or purge .
Blitzkrieg, "lightning-war;' was the name the Germans gave to the kind of high-speed offensive spearheaded by tanks that was taught them by British Major General John Frederick Charles Fuller (1878-1966).
Fuller's first Blitzkrieg struck on November 20, 1917, when 476 British tanks rolled ahead of six infantry and two cavalry divisions at the battle of Cambrai; the effect on the Germans was quite shattering and the British advanced about 5 miles in that day alone. Regarding this as a vindication of all his ideas, Fuller embarked on a crusade to mechanize and modernize the army but, increasingly disenchanted, quit in 1933 to team up with Sir Oswald Mosley on the Policy Directorate of the British Union of Fascists . He became, at Hitler 's side, a regular observer at German military maneuvers and guest of honor at Hitler's SOth birthday party on April 20, 1939. This was the last time he met his friend, General Heinz Guderian ( 1888-1954), who incorporated many of Fuller's ideas into his 1937 fireside page? turner, Achtung! Panzer! and was soon deploying the panzer brigades just as Fuller had taught him.                                                                                                                                               

                        Londoners used the truncated  term "Blitz" for the intensive air raids they endured from September 1940 to April 1941. As early as late 1940 the term had begun to be used metaphorically to denote an intensive strike or purge of any kind, e.g. "We will have to blitz the kitchen today, it's filthY:' Today, "blitzed" can also mean extremely drunk,-this likely arising as an intensifier of "bombed:'


Offline Smithy

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Re: DAILY BRIEFING
« Reply #196 on: February 27, 2018, 07:39:44 PM »
DID YOU KNOW ?

SCAM

noun
1.  a confidence game or other fraudulent scheme, especially for making a quick profit; swindle.

verb (used with object), scammed, scamming.
2.   to cheat or defraud with a scam

No one really knows where the word SCAM originates form
OED cites three definitions for the noun, all contemporaneous: a swindle (1963), a fraudulent bankruptcy (1966), and a rumor (1964). One of the examples given suggests that users at the time (mid ?60s) believed scam to originally be a carnival term, meaning ?to fleece the public.? Although this is included in an early example, it?s worth pointing out that it?s not actually given as the origin of the word (suggesting that someone?s done research down this route and so far come up empty).

One surprising thing is that I?ve found no suggestion that scam was somehow derived from scheme. At the very least this has a nice ring to it as a folk etymology (and scheme used in this way ? as a plan or design ? dates to at least 1704). There?s no documentation to support that theory, however.

After weeks of searching on the Internet I have found where the word SCAM actually comes from
If you would like to know , send 1000 baht to my Bangkok Bank No 2341-23456-0-1 and I will tell you my findings  moneysmile

Offline Smithy

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Re: DAILY BRIEFING
« Reply #197 on: June 17, 2018, 02:54:21 PM »
DID YOU KNOW ?

TRASH

Definition of trash

trashed; trashing; trashes
transitive verb
1 : throw away 1
standards of reality and truth were trashed ?Edwin Diamond
2 : vandalize, destroy
3 : attack, assault
4 : spoil, ruin trashing the environment
5 : to subject to criticism or invective; especially : to disparage strongly a film trashed by the critics
intransitive verb
: to trash something or someone

Recent Examples of trash from the Web

There are some very good people on that forum that I personal know but unfortunately they still have the trash.

The newspaper would be thrown way in the next day?s trash and the only proof of the offending idiotic column would be in the memory banks of few readers.

In the kitchen are two dishwashers, a trash compactor and two disposal units.

China's decision this year to stop accepting most imported scrap has meant lower prices for plastic and paper, placing greater pressure on cities and waste companies nationally and in Wisconsin to keep unwanted trash out of recycling bins.

There are a few theories on where the word 'Trash" comes from. Perhaps from a Scandinavian source (compare Old Norse tros "rubbish, fallen leaves and twigs," Norwegian dialectal trask "lumber, trash, baggage," Swedish trasa "rags, tatters"), of unknown origin. Applied to ill-bred persons or groups from 1604 ("Othello"), and especially of poor whites in the U.S. South by 1831. Applied to domestic refuse or garbage from 1906 (American English). Trash-can attested from 1914. To trash-talk someone or something is by 1989.


Offline rufusredtail

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Re: DAILY BRIEFING
« Reply #198 on: August 17, 2018, 07:32:50 PM »
DID YOU KNOW ?

LAST DITCH EFFORT

Final and determined attempt.
When 16th- and 17th-century armies were preparing the ground for a pitched battle, they would dig several lines of trenches in case they needed to retreat and regroup in prepared positions. If the men found themselves in the last ditch they had no option other than to fight where they stood or to die.

Offline rufusredtail

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Re: DAILY BRIEFING
« Reply #199 on: November 13, 2018, 03:18:01 PM »

DID YOU KNOW ?

CARTE BLANCHE

Complete freedom of action.
The old game of piquet was played with a reduced pack of 32 cards, all the low numbers from two through six being excluded. This raised the odds against a hand without face-cards, so a player with just carte( s) blanche( s), "white cards;' held complete sway over the game. Seventeenth-century gamesters would talk of someone in an unassailable position in any sphere as holding "cartes blanches" and the singularized version shifted into military and diplomatic circles in the 18th century to describe either a punitive acknowledgement of defeat, which left the vanquished no room for maneuver, or a blank sheet for them to sign so the victors could impose any conditions they fancied. A junior  might also hold a carte blanche from his superior so he could write above the signature a justification  for whatever actions had already taken place.


 

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